Coronavirus and Nursing Homes – What Can Be Done?

In the United States alone, there are 5 million senior citizens in nursing homes. In Israel, the population of elderly, aged 65 and over, is growing rapidly. In 2017, the elderly population of Israel crossed the 1-million line, amounting to about 11.6% of the total population.

But what are we doing to protect this layer of the population from the threat of coronavirus and other dangerous infectious diseases? After all, it is the elderly who are in the most vulnerable position to catch these illnesses. 

Some statistics

Probability of dying from coronavirus:

for 60-69 year olds – 3.6%

for 70-79 year olds – 8%

Elderly people aged 80+ are at the greatest risk, for them the probability of dying (in case they catch the Coronavirus) is 22%.

In addition, people with pre existing conditions such as respiratory system diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and diabetes are at a higher risk than healthy people. But it is precisely in old age that these complications are particularly prevalent.

Washington State as an example

At least 273 cases of coronavirus infection and most deaths (30 out of 38) occurred in Washington State. The main metropolis of this state – Seattle and its environs (total population – about 4 million people) became the largest outbreak of coronavirus in US.

19 of those 38 deaths in the state occurred at ‘Life Care Center’ – a nursing home located in Kirkland, a satellite city of Seattle with a population of about 90,000 people.

But why exactly did nursing homes become one of the most active distribution channels for coronavirus?

  • Coronavirus carries an increased danger for the elderly and those whose body is weakened by chronic diseases. There are almost no elderly people without chronic illnesses, so patients in nursing homes are doubly vulnerable.
  • The staff is in very close contact with the elderly. The staff themselves travel from the nursing home to other, less isolated locations where they are exposed to possible infection. Part of the staff, due to poor hand hygiene, will bring the infection to work.

Nursing homes need to adapt to new realities

  • Each staff representative should wash their hands efficiently and at appropriate intervals.
  • We must ensure the greatest possible isolation of the elderly from the outside world, but at the same time, we must give them the opportunity to feel needed and protected.
  • If you want to help and act as a volunteer, contact your local nursing home, social services or community charity organizations to see where you can contribute.

Soapy offers a unique solution for monitoring the hygiene of staff and patients. A smart micro-station for washing hands, which provides the right amount of water and reagents for washing hands and enables washing without touching a faucet. 

Micro-station also helps in ensuring that the hand-washing is performed correctly every time.

 

 
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Rings and bracelets during COVID19, it’s time to take them off

We all know by now how important hand washing is, particularly during these times with the Coronavirus epidemic.
As everyone is doing their best to avoid catching the virus, we’ve received many questions about wearing wristwatches and rings, and whether they might have a negative health impact.
Can rings and other jewelry be carriers of the COVID-19?

According to many experts, Coronavirus survives further on metal surfaces, like our rings, watches, and bracelets. Parts of the infection can remain under the jewelry, even if you wash your hands with rings on. Even though it is not yet clear that these residual amounts can affect the transmission of infection, we suggest that you do not tempt fate and remove your jewelry during this period or regularly wash them with warm water and soap.

Soapy’s advice for wearing rings and bracelets during COVID-19:
1) Do not wipe expensive stones and metals with an antiseptic, this may negatively affect your favorite jewelry.
2) Weigh the pros and cons of wearing your accessories during a COVID-19 infection – consider refraining for wearing jewelry for now.
3) If you choose to continue wearing your bling – be extra meticulous with cleaning them no less than twice a day.

Take care of yourself and keep the distance!

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Staying at home during COVID-19? This wellness guide is just for you!

Coronavirus has strongly affected the lives of all of us and today a large number of people are forced to stay at home. Our company has prepared a small guide on how to stay mentally and physically healthy these days!

Remote work
Remote work during COVID-19

It is now difficult to find a person who would not be somehow affected by the influence of this virus. The daily routine has changed a lot for many people. You no longer need to go to work or hold meetings with your colleagues (except for remote communication of course), but since for many of us this routine is completely new, here are some simple tips on how to maintain your mental and physical health!

Time plan

A simple regimen can significantly save your inner strength and calm in your family; a daily plan is especially important for young children.

Whether you work from home or just quarantine, you should have a clear daily routine. When are breakfast, lunch, and dinner? When is the time for playing with children and when you watch movies and TV shows? Get up in the morning, do your exercises and cook yourself a nutritious breakfast. Do not forget to get out of your pajamas, so it will be easier for you to go into working condition. Try to divide space into the working space and everything else. Try not to work in bed or in front of the TV, as this can distract attention and increase anxiety. Proper posture is up to you and your chair, so provide yourself with an ergonomic workspace – you don’t want back pain.

Proper nutrition

Work at home can negatively affect our nutritional schedule. Still when the refrigerator is so close! Frequent snacks can completely change your normal diet. If you still allow yourself small snacks, then they should be nutritious: nuts, dried fruits, and sliced vegetables. This way you can have a snack without bad feelings and at the same time, you get a large portion of vitamins and other important elements.

Drink water

If you only drink tea and coffee, you might get dehydrated. Experts recommend drinking water, not soft drinks, to fight thirst and restore water balance. After a cup of tea containing caffeine, nutritionists advise drinking another glass of water.

The caffeine contained in coffee leaches calcium from the body and interferes with its absorption. Half a liter of water improves metabolism by 30%, favorably affects digestion and the functioning of all organs. A lot of water is also good for your skin’s condition.

Exercise

Warm-up allows you to bring to working condition those muscle groups that in the near future will have to work during the day. The simplest example of a warm-up is felt every morning immediately after waking up. Almost involuntary sipping prepares the body to move to a vertical position, spreading and slightly warming up the muscles of the arms, legs and straightening the spine. It is important to do a small warm-up in the morning and to make pauses in work in front of the computer. Exercise will relieve stress and help you stay fit even without going to the gym. You can also download mobile apps to help you do the exercises correctly.

Get enough sleep

Sleep is critical for keeping yourself healthy. Although it may seem that you can stay awake all night, breaking your sleep habits can also endanger your immune system. Try to maintain your normal sleep pattern or improve it. Get seven to eight hours of sleep if working from home. This will not only strengthen your immune system but also improve your mood and productivity throughout the day.

Wash your hands more often

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; and before eating or preparing food. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry.

Soap and water are the best options if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets, and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool, or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe, according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product, such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during the use of the product.

Pro tip: Give special attention to the entrance of the house/flat. It has to be separate from the other rooms as much as possible.

Assure that everybody: 

  • Takes off their shoes at the entrance
  • Makes laundry more often
  • Does dishes more frequently – do not leave piles of dishes in the sink
  • Takes a good shower with soap

*Steps 6 & 7 are taken from the CDC. Full information can be found here.

**Editor’s Note: The information in this article is intended for your educational use only; it does not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Soapy; and is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition and before undertaking any diet, supplement, fitness, or other health programs.

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Soapy decides to allow it’s employees to work remotely

Soapy decides to allow its employees to work from home, but still fights Covid-19 in the front!

Our CEO Max Simonovsky decided to allow employees at Soapy to work remotely. This decision was made 10 days ago (March 5th).

Even though we are working remotely, our team was never more united in trying to prevent morbidity! 

This is a necessary step to keep all of them away from a chance of getting infected by Coronavirus. Some employees need to go through public places that are not safe anymore. 

Soapy will provide its customers with a high level of service even these days. We will ensure that all our units work properly to help our customers to maintain a high level of hand-hygiene. 

We call other companies to take this step as they in charge of their employees’ safety and health.

Please do not hesitate to reach us out for any type of information, soon we will post a guide of what else can help beside Hand Hygiene.

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CNN – The best prevention against the coronavirus is still washing your hands

(CNN)When it comes to novel coronavirus protection, face masks are futile. There isn’t a vaccine yet. So the best way to prevent transmission of the novel coronavirus is washing your hands — thoroughly — with soap and water, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
And yes, there’s a right way to wash your hands. It’s something of an art form — a timed, multistep process that can involve some light singing.
Here’s the CDC’s official hand-washing how-to. All you need to follow along is a sink and soap.
Step 1
Wet your hands with clean, running water. Then, turn off the tap and soap up your hands. Soap is more effective at removing germs than water alone.
Step 2
Work the soap into a lather by rubbing your hands together. Lather soap onto the backs of your hands, in between your fingers and under your nails. Lathering causes friction, which strips pesky germs and dirt from the skin. Be sure to get into the nooks and crannies, too — germs lurk there.
Source CNN
Step 3
Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Sing or hum “Happy Birthday” twice through to keep time. There’s no magic number, but washing your hands for at least 20 seconds has been shown to remove more microbes than washing for shorter periods does. Singing “Happy Birthday” is just a fun way to make sure you’re scrubbing long enough.
Step 4
Rinse your hands well under clean, running water. You’ve lifted the germs from your hands. Clean water flushes them off.
Step 5
Dry your hands using a clean towel or air-dry them (or a bit of both). Wet hands easily transfer viruses. Drying them off lessens that risk.
Original publication: link
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BLOOMBERG: How to Avoid Coronavirus on Flights | Forget Masks, Says Top Airline Doctor

Forget face masks and rubber gloves.

The best way to avoid the coronavirus is frequent hand washing, according to a medical adviser to the world’s airlines.

The virus can’t survive long on seats or armrests, so physical contact with another person carries the greatest risk of infection on a flight, said David Powell, a physician and medical adviser to the International Air Transport Association. Masks and gloves do a better job of spreading bugs than stopping them, he said.    

As concern mounts about the scale of the outbreak, carriers from United Airlines Holdings Inc. to Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd. have scrapped thousands of flights to China. Here is an edited transcript from an interview with Powell. IATA represents about 290 airlines and more than 80% of global air traffic.

Q: Is there a risk of becoming contaminated with the virus on a plane?

A: The risk of catching a serious viral infection on an aircraft is low. The air supply to a modern airliner is very different from a movie theater or an office building. The air is a combination of fresh air and recirculated air, about half each. The recirculated air goes through filters of the exact same type that we use in surgical operating theaters. That supplied air is guaranteed to be 99.97% (or better) free of viruses and other particles. So the risk, if there is one, does not come from the supplied air. It comes from other people.  

Q: What are the chances of getting the virus by touching the seats, armrest or any of the objects on a plane?

A: Viruses and other microbes like to live on living surfaces like us. Just shaking hands with somebody will be a greater risk by far than some dry surface that has no biological material on it. The survival of viruses on surfaces isn’t great, so it’s believed that normal cleaning, and then the extra cleaning in the event that someone was discovered to be contagious, is the appropriate procedure. Will people stop getting together inside an airplane? I would respond by asking: Will I stop going to the movies, or sports games, or concerts or conferences? I don’t think so.

Q: What’s important if you are on a plane to ensure you don’t get infected?

A: Hand hygiene — because contrary to what people think, the hands are the way that these viruses most efficiently spread. Top of the list is frequent hand washing, hand sanitizing, or both. Avoid touching your face. If you cough or sneeze, it’s important to cover your face with a sleeve. Better yet, a tissue to be disposed of carefully, and then sanitizing the hands afterward. Washing your hands and drying them is the best procedure. When that’s not easy to do, alcohol-based sanitizer is a good second-best.  

Q: Does wearing masks and gloves help prevent infections?

A: First of all, masks. There’s very limited evidence of benefit, if any, in a casual situation. Masks are useful for those who are unwell to protect other people from them. But wearing a mask all the time will be ineffective. It will allow viruses to be transmitted around it, through it and worse still, if it becomes moist it will encourage the growth of viruses and bacteria. Gloves are probably even worse, because people put on gloves and then touch everything they would have touched with their hands. So it just becomes another way of transferring micro-organisms. And inside the gloves, your hands get hot and sweaty, which is a really good environment for microbes to grow.  

Q: Is shutting borders the answer to containing the spread of the virus?  

A: One thing that’s changed in the world is the ability for infections to travel rapidly from one location to another and it’s true that aviation is part of that. At the same time, aviation is essential to dealing with outbreaks like this. And this is why we have collaboration with the World Health Organization and IATA that’s been in place for several years. If countries just shut down during disease outbreaks, as happened in west Africa with Ebola, that can make things much worse. During that outbreak, the country struggled, WHO couldn’t get their people in, they couldn’t get biological samples out. The economic impact of being shut off made things worse. General travel bans can make things worse. It can encourage people to travel in secret, which means you lose control of it.  

Q: When can we safely say that the worst may be over?  

A: The number of cases has continued to increase at around about 16% to 20% each day. Until we get to the point where those numbers are declining, we couldn’t say we turned the corner.   (Adds to the second answer the notion that behavior in public spaces is unlikely to be curbed. A previous version of this story corrected the spelling of the doctor’s name.)  

For the original article follow this link

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