Category: Hygiene in health news

Can Automated Machines Change the way we wash our hands?

During the past few years, the future has been racing toward us faster than ever, with innovative ideas changing how we interact with our environment. Just a few decades ago the idea of smartphones, smart cars, and an electronic social network that connects us all seemed like sci-fi.

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Implementing Hand Hygiene In Healthcare Settings – Sounds Easy? Think Again

Hospitals and healthcare facilities need to help raise hand hygiene standards. Here are some of the difficulties they are faced.

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The WHO’s 5 Moments for Handwashing

The WHO designed the “5 moments for handwashing” in an effort to diminish the risk of infection inside the healthcare system.

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AIPAC: Soapy Takes the Guesswork Out Of Washing Hands

The recent outbreak of COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of proper hand hygiene in the fight against infectious diseases. Max Simonovsky, Soapy Care’s CEO and co-founder, explained to AIPAC about Soapy’s revolutionary solution – the ECO micro-station

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Disposable Gloves Are Unhygienic – Here’s Why

The assumption that simply wearing gloves can stop the spread of COVID-19 and other diseases isn’t correct at all. Gloves are, in fact, unhygienic.

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CBN Featured Soapy In An Article – And You’ve Got To See It!

This incredible article accurately represents what we try to accomplish here in Soapy, and if you’re curious about what we do here – you absolutely have to see or read it!

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Soapy is on the COVID-19 fighting map!

It’s an honor to be recognized as one of 80 Israeli startups fighting COVID-19 by Startup Nation Central.

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Coronavirus and Nursing Homes – What Can Be Done?

In the United States alone, there are 5 million senior citizens in nursing homes. In Israel, the population of elderly, aged 65 and over, is growing rapidly. In 2017, the elderly population of Israel crossed the 1-million line, amounting to about 11.6% of the total population.

But what are we doing to protect this layer of the population from the threat of coronavirus and other dangerous infectious diseases? After all, it is the elderly who are in the most vulnerable position to catch these illnesses. 

Some statistics

Probability of dying from coronavirus:

for 60-69 year olds – 3.6%

for 70-79 year olds – 8%

Elderly people aged 80+ are at the greatest risk, for them the probability of dying (in case they catch the Coronavirus) is 22%.

In addition, people with pre existing conditions such as respiratory system diseases, cardiovascular system diseases and diabetes are at a higher risk than healthy people. But it is precisely in old age that these complications are particularly prevalent.

Washington State as an example

At least 273 cases of coronavirus infection and most deaths (30 out of 38) occurred in Washington State. The main metropolis of this state – Seattle and its environs (total population – about 4 million people) became the largest outbreak of coronavirus in US.

19 of those 38 deaths in the state occurred at ‘Life Care Center’ – a nursing home located in Kirkland, a satellite city of Seattle with a population of about 90,000 people.

But why exactly did nursing homes become one of the most active distribution channels for coronavirus?

  • Coronavirus carries an increased danger for the elderly and those whose body is weakened by chronic diseases. There are almost no elderly people without chronic illnesses, so patients in nursing homes are doubly vulnerable.
  • The staff is in very close contact with the elderly. The staff themselves travel from the nursing home to other, less isolated locations where they are exposed to possible infection. Part of the staff, due to poor hand hygiene, will bring the infection to work.

Nursing homes need to adapt to new realities

  • Each staff representative should wash their hands efficiently and at appropriate intervals.
  • We must ensure the greatest possible isolation of the elderly from the outside world, but at the same time, we must give them the opportunity to feel needed and protected.
  • If you want to help and act as a volunteer, contact your local nursing home, social services or community charity organizations to see where you can contribute.

Soapy offers a unique solution for monitoring the hygiene of staff and patients. A smart micro-station for washing hands, which provides the right amount of water and reagents for washing hands and enables washing without touching a faucet. 

Micro-station also helps in ensuring that the hand-washing is performed correctly every time.

 

 
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Calcalist Tech: This Startup Wants to Fight Coronavirus With Soap and Water

Calcalist Tech: This Startup Wants to Fight Coronavirus With Soap and Water

Soapy Care develops smart sinks that incorporate computer vision analytics and IoT technologies to help people wash their hands more efficiently

As fears surrounding the coronavirus continue to grow and the number of people forced into home-quarantine rises, Israeli startup Soapy Care Ltd. is aiming to halt the spread of the virus by helping people wash their hands more efficiently.

Founded in 2018 and based in Rehovot in central Israel, smart hygiene startup Soapy Care develops smart sinks that incorporate computer vision analytics and Internet of things (IoT) technologies, Max Simonovsky, the company’s co-founder and CEO said in a Monday interview with Calcalist.

The smart sinks are autonomous and replace traditional sinks, Simonovsky said. Soapy Care’s sinks can be programmed with different settings, including the amount of time the water runs or the precise amount of soap or sanitizer dispensed, in accordance with where the smart sinks are situated, be it at restaurants, hospitals, retirement homes, daycares, or in private homes, Simonovsky said.

While the company suggests using specific types of soaps for better results, their sinks can be used with any standard soap, he said.

The idea for the smart sinks arose a few years ago when Simonovsky’s son, who was two years old at the time, told him he does not think handwashing is important given that some of the sinks at his daycare do not work properly.

Since the coronavirus outbreak, the company has dropped its prices for customers in hard-hit areas, such as China and South Korea, to help halt the spread of the virus, he said. The outbreak has led to a mass increase in the demand for Soapy Care’s smart sinks, Simonovsky added.

Soapy Care’s technology can be found at restaurants, factories, and daycares in countries including Israel, the U.S., Angola, and India, he said. The company has raised more than $1 million to date and employs a team of 22 people.

Source: Calcalist Tech

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