Category: News

Soapy decides to allow it’s employees to work remotely

Soapy decides to allow its employees to work from home, but still fights Covid-19 in the front!

Our CEO Max Simonovsky decided to allow employees at Soapy to work remotely. This decision was made 10 days ago (March 5th).

Even though we are working remotely, our team was never more united in trying to prevent morbidity! 

This is a necessary step to keep all of them away from a chance of getting infected by Coronavirus. Some employees need to go through public places that are not safe anymore. 

Soapy will provide its customers with a high level of service even these days. We will ensure that all our units work properly to help our customers to maintain a high level of hand-hygiene. 

We call other companies to take this step as they in charge of their employees’ safety and health.

Please do not hesitate to reach us out for any type of information, soon we will post a guide of what else can help beside Hand Hygiene.

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Calcalist Tech: This Startup Wants to Fight Coronavirus With Soap and Water

Soapy Care develops smart sinks that incorporate computer vision analytics and IoT technologies to help people wash their hands more efficiently

As fears surrounding the coronavirus continue to grow and the number of people forced into home-quarantine rises, Israeli startup Soapy Care Ltd. is aiming to halt the spread of the virus by helping people wash their hands more efficiently.

Founded in 2018 and based in Rehovot in central Israel, smart hygiene startup Soapy Care develops smart sinks that incorporate computer vision analytics and Internet of things (IoT) technologies, Max Simonovsky, the company’s co-founder and CEO said in a Monday interview with Calcalist.

The smart sinks are autonomous and replace traditional sinks, Simonovsky said. Soapy Care’s sinks can be programmed with different settings, including the amount of time the water runs or the precise amount of soap or sanitizer dispensed, in accordance with where the smart sinks are situated, be it at restaurants, hospitals, retirement homes, daycares, or in private homes, Simonovsky said.

While the company suggests using specific types of soaps for better results, their sinks can be used with any standard soap, he said.

The idea for the smart sinks arose a few years ago when Simonovsky’s son, who was two years old at the time, told him he does not think handwashing is important given that some of the sinks at his daycare do not work properly.

Since the coronavirus outbreak, the company has dropped its prices for customers in hard-hit areas, such as China and South Korea, to help halt the spread of the virus, he said. The outbreak has led to a mass increase in the demand for Soapy Care’s smart sinks, Simonovsky added.

Soapy Care’s technology can be found at restaurants, factories, and daycares in countries including Israel, the U.S., Angola, and India, he said. The company has raised more than $1 million to date and employs a team of 22 people.

Source: Calcalist Tech

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CNN – The best prevention against the coronavirus is still washing your hands

(CNN)When it comes to novel coronavirus protection, face masks are futile. There isn’t a vaccine yet. So the best way to prevent transmission of the novel coronavirus is washing your hands — thoroughly — with soap and water, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
And yes, there’s a right way to wash your hands. It’s something of an art form — a timed, multistep process that can involve some light singing.
Here’s the CDC’s official hand-washing how-to. All you need to follow along is a sink and soap.
Step 1
Wet your hands with clean, running water. Then, turn off the tap and soap up your hands. Soap is more effective at removing germs than water alone.
Step 2
Work the soap into a lather by rubbing your hands together. Lather soap onto the backs of your hands, in between your fingers and under your nails. Lathering causes friction, which strips pesky germs and dirt from the skin. Be sure to get into the nooks and crannies, too — germs lurk there.
Source CNN
Step 3
Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. Sing or hum “Happy Birthday” twice through to keep time. There’s no magic number, but washing your hands for at least 20 seconds has been shown to remove more microbes than washing for shorter periods does. Singing “Happy Birthday” is just a fun way to make sure you’re scrubbing long enough.
Step 4
Rinse your hands well under clean, running water. You’ve lifted the germs from your hands. Clean water flushes them off.
Step 5
Dry your hands using a clean towel or air-dry them (or a bit of both). Wet hands easily transfer viruses. Drying them off lessens that risk.
Original publication: link
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Coronavirus – what we know about it and how we can protect ourselves from getting ill?

According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
According to the World Health Organisation Coronaviruses (CoV) are a large family of viruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS-CoV) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS-CoV). A novel coronavirus (nCoV) is a new strain that has not been previously identified in humans.
Coronaviruses are zoonotic types of viruses, meaning they are transmitted between animals and people. Snakes – the Chinese krait and the Chinese cobra – might be the original source of the newly discovered coronavirus that has triggered an outbreak of a deadly infectious respiratory illness in China this year.
How does the infection pass from one to another?
The virus is transmitted both by airborne droplets and by contact: for example, through the touch of dirty hands to the eyes.
Know the Symptoms
The first signs of infection are dry cough, difficulty breathing, fever, and weakness. In some cases, the disease goes away without pneumonia but is accompanied by a dry cough and a low temperature. In more severe cases, the infection can evolve into pneumonia, severe acute respiratory syndrome, kidney failure, and even death. The incubation period of coronavirus lasts from 2 to 12 days.
Prevention
Be aware of washing hands and talking less with other people at close range.
Assure to cover your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing. Avoid close contact with anyone showing symptoms of respiratory illness such as coughing and sneezing. It is emphasized that mild symptoms do not mean that a person cannot infect others.
Is it really helpful to wear a respiratory protection mask?
It is recommended to wear masks and assure that you are not touching your nose under it, especially when you shacked hands with somebody before. It is important to change your mask every new day or when you feel it is not clean enough.

The situation is aggravated by the fact that Asia is now celebrating the New Year, which means that many Chinese go to visit relatives.

The virus has spread to a number of Asian countries and has spread to France, USA, Canada and more. See the map below:
#coronavirusoutbreak #coronarovirus #nCoV #outbreak #virus #handswashing #handshygiene
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Soapy is on the Map!

With its unique history and rich cultural heritage, Israel is also among the forward-looking countries placing a heavy emphasis on innovation and technology. Many indicators – from research and development spending to intellectual property – support this statement. Last year, the nine-million-people-large state entered the top 10 list of the Global Innovation Index, an annual ranking published by INSEAD and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Israel’s figures are impressive by any standards. 
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
In this article, we talk about some layers beyond microelectronics. The growth-stage enterprises that are making attempts within the blurry border zone between physical and digital are in our scope this time. The Internet of Things (IoT), a construct that many consider conceptually fusty nowadays, is still yet to show its full potential – this is one of those areas where theory has far surpassed practice (we don’t mean to call it ‘futurology’).
As the gap between the IoT that exists in PowerPoint slides and the one that exists in the real world becomes even more evident, a bunch of commercial opportunities are appearing for those who are able to employ unconventional approaches to thorny problems using IoT. A plethora of startups are trying their best in the ever-emerging domain in Israel.
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
It is no surprise at all that these conditions have given birth to one of the most rapidly growing startup ecosystems globally. For one thing, there are six Israeli firms in EqualOcean’s current ‘Next Global Tech 50: Semiconductors’ list of the most outstanding chipmaking rookies; these have been selected by the use of 12 independent criteria, such as total PE/VC funding amount, market valuation and founders’ background information – as well as several technological and macroeconomic indicators.
In this article, we talk about some layers beyond microelectronics. The growth-stage enterprises that are making attempts within the blurry border zone between physical and digital are in our scope this time. The Internet of Things (IoT), a construct that many consider conceptually fusty nowadays, is still yet to show its full potential – this is one of those areas where theory has far surpassed practice (we don’t mean to call it ‘futurology’).
As the gap between the IoT that exists in PowerPoint slides and the one that exists in the real world becomes even more evident, a bunch of commercial opportunities are appearing for those who are able to employ unconventional approaches to thorny problems using IoT. A plethora of startups are trying their best in the ever-emerging domain in Israel.
Here comes the first insight. Taking into account funding rounds that have been announced over the past several years, we can see that the investment activity has been going full blast between January and March each year. (Is the fruitless fourth quarter of 2019 the calm before the storm?)
Besides, the annual amount of money banked by Israeli IoT challengers peaked in the third quarter of 2017, when pilotless drone solution developer Airobotics bagged USD 32.5 million from Californian fund BlueRun Ventures among other investors; the same year, machine learning pioneer Iguazio took home USD 33 million.
We have seen a few more big rounds in this sphere, not to mention some adjacent fields like software, which is traditionally strong in a country famous for its programmers. Silicon Wadi, an analog of the well-known American region, is germinating multiple disruptors here and there, making the world’s finest institutional and corporate investors pay attention. 
So, why Tel Aviv?
Indeed, being the capital is not enough. Though most of the high-income small-sized economies are often associated with one (two, at the max) colossal cities, this story is more complicated in Israel. For instance, the population is almost evenly distributed across the country’s six districts – and Tel Aviv is only second on the list. The OECD’s 2018 edition of ‘Regions and Cities at a Glance’ shows that the city is leading by four of the 10 ‘well-being’ aspects, while the Central district (or HaMerkaz) is excelling in the other four.
In order to answer the question above, we employed a proxy that is pretty close to the topic of this article. Namely, the number of startups that leverage IoT. Aside from that, there are two other variables that fortify the argument in favor of Tel Aviv: the total dollar volume of venture capital raised and the number of private equity investment events. 
Taking over half of all the three ‘pies,’ the capital of Israel has some substantial numbers to prove its local dominance. Out of 67 recently active private IoT companies, 37 are located in Tel Aviv’s agglomerated zone. Since 2014, they have completed 73 rounds of financing, nabbing over USD 270 million to carry out their long-cherished ideas.
Not alike
These 37 firms are, for sure, different in many respects. Both the technologies they leverage and the ways they make (or intend to make) money are unalike. As the former is typically dictated by the applications – which is a new normal, look at the Integrated Circuit (IC) industry, for example – we divided the Tel Aviv startups into 11 groups based on the real economy sectors that they are operating in. 
As a matter of fact, connectivity of any type must be secure as modern-day misdeeds like data theft and invasion of privacy are, paradoxical as it may sound, becoming easier as technology advances. Since 2014, Tel Aviv-based network security companies have gained over a third of the total dollar volume of IoT PE/VC funding in the city.
Two-year-old IT firm Axonius, for one, had a productive 2019: after raising USD 13 million from Bessemer in February, it proceeded with a USD 20 million Series B in August. Another young and promising player – end-to-end security solution provider VDOO – absorbed USD 32 million in GGV Capital-led Series B last year.
At the forefront of a quest to optimize manufacturing environments and operations by deploying smart sensors and accelerating information transmission, the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) is also widely represented in the affluent middle eastern country.
Tel Aviv’s up-and-coming IoT hardware producers, retail tech companies and smart home evangelists also obtained relatively big amounts of money between 2014 and 2019. The largest disclosed round in these three clusters was closed by deep learning microprocessor developer Hailo. Backed by Chinese fund Glory Ventures (耀途资本) and the automotive industry-focused Maniv Mobility, the chipmaker has raised a total of USD 24.5 million in venture capital to date.
The other sectors are significant too. Let’s take, for example, the retail industry or the smart home domain. One would think a country with almost no domestic market doesn’t need its own Alibabas and Xiaomis. However, the scale is not the only factor: many business models in the consumer sector can be easily adapted to other markets. As a result, companies like ‘customer experience crafter’ Anagog appear and attract investors’ attention.
Here below, we have compiled a list of 20 early-stage Tel Aviv upstarts with significant growth potential and exceptional business models, using a handful of investment and business-related variables. The final list of ‘laureates’ spans ten distinct areas, including incumbent industries like healthcare and logistics, as well as evolving concepts like smart cities and IIoT. 
For the original article follow this link
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Soapy is on the main stage of the largest positive impact gathering in the world

Our Founder & CEO, Max Simonovsky, is going to present our mission at the largest impact gathering in the world – ChangeNow 2020 that will take place on January 30-31 and February 1st, 2020. PARIS, Grand Palais.
We are excited to share this great news! Please join us on our journey to a better world.
This summit is also called: World Expo of solutions for the planet.
ChangeNOW is all about concrete actions and innovations: climate change, end of plastic pollution, new forms of agriculture, new models of education, solutions to the refugee crisis, clean energy, sustainable cities, … and other solutions to our most urgent global issues.
Wish us a stroke of good luck and share your support!
See you soon in Paris!
#ChangeNow2020 #Innovation #Summit #Hygiene #SmartHygiene
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Soapy is the most promising innovation of 2019!

Today, January 7th, 2020, after an unbelievable year that Israel – the Startup Nation had (M&A’s, investment rounds that we never saw before with a new level of innovation), the Israeli ecosystem was reviewed on KAN-REKA radio with Guy Zbarski (Investor, serial entrepreneur and innovator).
Soapy was chosen as the number 1, the most promising innovation of the past year(2019)
Number 1 of the entire ecosystem, thanks for the warm words and trust!
We are happy to be among such companies like Matricel (#2) that 3d printed human heart! Or Hazilu (#3) that use computer vision on the seashore to predict and prevent people from drowning as well as Certify(#4) that use AI for combatting Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) through transparency and collaboration. And LittleOne.Care(#5) who has developed a smart band designed to tracks the baby’s happiness and physical activity levels throughout the day and alerts parents when it detects that the baby’s vital signs or vocalizations have left the normal range.
We are happy to be among such companies like Matricel (#2) that 3d printed human heart! Or Hazilu (#3) that use computer vision on the seashore to predict and prevent people from drowning as well as Certify(#4) that use AI for combatting Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI) through transparency and collaboration. And LittleOne.Care(#5) who has developed a smart band designed to tracks the baby’s happiness and physical activity levels throughout the day and alerts parents when it detects that the baby’s vital signs or vocalizations have left the normal range.
Thanks for the trust, as we are used to saying, this is only the beginning, much more is ahead!
To hear the full review please follow this link (1:40).
And to hear an interview with our CEO, Max Simonovsky, where he explains in details about our technology and value proposition you can find on this link(11:30)
#News #Radio #innovation #number1
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Jersusalem Shawarma facing backlash after suspected norovirus outbreak at Calgary restaurants

A family-owned chain of Calgary shawarma restaurants is facing backlash after Alberta Health Services revealed a suspected norovirus outbreak linked to their restaurants.
According to AHS, nearly 130 people have registered complaints that they fell ill after eating food from Jerusalem Shawarma.
AHS said Thursday it received its first complaint about Jerusalem Shawarma on Dec. 6.
More complaints were later made by 17 different groups who said they ate food from multiple Jerusalem Shawarma locations from Dec. 4 to 12.
“Please don’t judge us,” Jerusalem Shawarma co-owner Izzo AbuFarha said. “It was just an isolated [incident] in one of our locations, it didn’t happen all over the place.”
AbuFarha and his five brothers own the 10-restaurant chain, which opened in 2013.
He said they’ve has complied with AHS health inspectors, who recommended the restaurant wash common surfaces and the washrooms every 30 minutes.
AHS said they are currently investigating each complaint to verify the claims, with many coming from groups that fell ill after eating catered lunches.
All of the chain’s locations were inspected by AHS, but none of the restaurants were ordered to close.
“Anything that was of concern, like the ready-to-eat food products, have all been discarded — those things have been started from scratch again. There’s been full disinfections at each of the locations, so we’ve ensured that public safety is number one,” AHS Calgary Zone safe food program manager Sarah Nunn said.
“If there was any serious concerns, then absolutely those locations would’ve been closed.”
Following the news of the AHS investigation, AbuFarha said the restaurant has seen a steep decline in business, including multiple cancellations of catering orders.
He said the restaurant has also received racist comments. “This is something we’ve been getting on a daily basis, lots of bad comments, lots of messages, lots of threatening, lots of phone calls to our staff, to our employees,” AbuFarha said.
Faizan Butt, the lawyer representing Jerusalem Shawarma, said the investigation has been blown out of proportion.
According to AHS, the virus is common around this time of year and is extremely contagious. Symptoms of norovirus include severe stomach pain, vomiting and diarrhea, and can last anywhere from 24 to 60 hours, AHS said.
The best way to prevent infection is to wash your hands often and wash fruits and vegetables before eating them.
“The biggest thing is it’s out there in the community, and it’s about prevention,” Nunn said. “It’s about making sure that we don’t pass this on to anybody else.”
Nunn said AHS takes every complaint seriously and recommends anybody with concerns to contact AHS or 811 with health questions.​
AbuFarha said his employees are taking AHS’ advice seriously, all in an effort to go on with business as usual.
“We’re seeking the support of our community, we’re seeking the support of Calgarians in making this business get back to normal,” he said.
With files from Global News’ Kaylen Small
Original article: LINK
#Outbreak #Norovirus #Food #AHS #JerusalemShawarma #Canada #Calgary
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Classroom Experiment Shows the Importance of Hand-Washing — Just in Time for Flu Season

A science teacher is imploring students and parents to wash their hands after posting the results of her classroom’s stomach-churning experiment.
Flu season is in full swing. The CDC is reporting that 30 states—especially southern states like Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina—are already seeing flu activity. A preliminary estimates report states that there have already been 1.7 million to 2.5 million flu illnesses nationwide between October and November. Thankfully, there are measures everyone can take to keep the virus at bay. And a science teacher from Idaho is spreading awareness with a jaw-dropping post that has gone viral.
Jaralee Annice Metcalf shared photos of a science project she did with her class, writing alongside a series of photos, “We took fresh bread and touched it. We did one slice untouched. One with unwashed hands. One with hand sanitizer. One with washed hands with warm water and soap. Then, we decided to rub a piece on all our classroom Chromebooks.” The result: “So DISGUSTING!!!”
Photos by : COURTESY OF JARALEE ANNICE METCALF
Metcalf pointed out that yes, the school typically sanitizes the Chromebooks but didn’t for this experiment, the results took three to four weeks due to the bread’s preservatives which extend shelf life, and the bread was placed in tightly-sealed freezer Ziploc bags.
“If the bread had been exposed to air and moisture, the experiment may have gone faster,” Metcalf tells Parents.com. “The breads that were very clearly exposed to different germs grew mold quicker. And ones touches by clean hands plus the soap and water ones were not exposed to the germs that cause the mold growth to quicken.”
In her Facebook post, Metcalf identified herself “as somebody who is sick and tired of being sick and tired of being sick and tired and urged followers to wash their hands” and urged her followers to wash their hands, remind their kids to wash their hands, and to remember that hand sanitizer is not an alternative to washing your hands.
She pointed those interested in doing the experiment themselves to instructions provided on C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital’s website.
Since Metcalf shared the images, her post has earned over 59K shares and over 8K comments.
Ultimately, the science teacher hopes that parents not only better understand the importance of hand-washing but that they take the results into consideration when their child comes down with a bug. “Germs spread rapidly,” Metcalf tells Parents.com. “And it doesn’t matter how often they’re told or how well they’re taught to wash their hands, children won’t always do it properly or enough.” That said, when hand-washing fails, a sick day might be called for, which could preempt illnesses like the flu from spreading even further.
Original publication: link
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A norovirus outbreak shut down an entire Colorado school district right before Thanksgiving

A Colorado school district has closed more than 40 schools after a highly contagious virus outbreak.
It’s the first time the Mesa County Valley School District 51 has had to close all schools due to illness, the district said Wednesday.
“We are taking this highly unusual action because this virus is extremely contagious and spreading quickly across our schools,”
Nursing Coordinator Tanya Marvin said in the statement.
More than a dozen schools in the state’s 14th largest district reported increased absences “due to illness and several incidences of vomiting in public areas of the schools,” according to the Mesa County Public Health Department.
A second, related virus has also been affecting students in recent weeks, the district said.
“The combination of the two has created an unprecedented spread of illness.”
“Onset of symptoms for both types of viruses, including vomiting, is incredibly fast. The second version also causes fever in several cases,” the district statement said.
The health department says it is working to identify the illness, which is “acting a lot like norovirus” and lasts between 12-24 hours.
Norovirus, sometimes called the “stomach bug,” is easily spread through direct contact, consuming contaminated food or water, or touching contaminated surfaces and then putting your hands in your mouth, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The very young, older people, and those with other illnesses are most vulnerable to severe dehydration.
The closure includes all after-school activities, the district said, and schools will remained closed until after Thanksgiving break.
Mesa County Valley School District 51 is the largest school district between Salt Lake City, Utah, and Denver, Colorado, the district website says. It serves more than 22,000 students in 46 schools and programs, employing nearly 3,000 employees.
Tips on how to avoid the illness include thoroughly washing hands and staying away from people who are sick.
“When you have norovirus, the very dramatic symptom people have is often violent vomiting that hits you pretty suddenly,” said Amesh Adalja, MD, a spokesperson for the Infectious Diseases Society of America and a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health Security in Baltimore, Maryland.
“You have nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, and it usually lasts 24 to 48 hours,” he told Healthline. “It can be a pretty grueling 24 to 48 hours.”
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)Trusted Source reports the virus sickens millions of people each year. The very young, older people, and those with other illnesses are most vulnerable to severe dehydration.
Each year, as many as 71,000 people are hospitalized. Between 500 and 800 die.
Picture: Getty
“What’s very striking about norovirus is that it’s very highly infectious. And if you’re exposed to it, there’s a very high likelihood you could be infected by it, even if you’re in good health,” Adalja said.
Easy to get, hard to shakeExperts say that when someone is sick with norovirus, they have large amounts of the virus in them, although it only takes a little to make you sick.
“We know that people who have the virus shed it in very large numbers in their fecal material. We’re talking millions to billions of virus particles in a gram,” said Lee-Ann Jaykus, PhD, a professor in the department of food, bioprocessing, and nutrition sciences at North Carolina State University.
“It probably doesn’t take more than 100 particles to make you sick,” she told Healthline.
Jaykus says scientists know the virus is passed from person to person. That happens when an infected person doesn’t wash their hands after using the bathroom.
The surfaces they touch can become contaminated. If the infected person is a food handler, they can pass the virus onto your food.
They also know that when an infected person vomits, that surface will be contaminated.
But more recently, researchers learned that norovirus may also be transmitted in the air from the repeated vomiting.
“A lot of times this is what we call projectile vomiting, very forceful and severe, literally across the room,” Jaykus explained. “Some of that vomitus gets aerosolized, and it has norovirus in it.”
To study how this happens, Jaykus and a team of researchers actually built a vomiting machine to test how norovirus spreads. The machine simulated human vomiting.
The team used a surrogate virus, which wouldn’t make anybody sick. Then they measured the airborne virus particles.
The scientists publishedTrusted Source the findings of their study in the PLOS One journal in 2015.
“You can detect it. The numbers are not as high as in fecal material, but it’s there,” Jaykus added. “What happens is some of the virus gets aerosolized, people breathe it in. It hits the mucous membranes, goes into the stomach, and the infection process starts.”
And once it starts spreading through a community, the virus is hard to get rid of.
“This particular virus is extraordinarily resistant to the sanitizers and disinfectants that we commonly use at regulated concentrations and contact times,” Jaykus said.
“It’s also incredibly persistent. If I were to put norovirus on a surface in front of me right now, it would probably remain capable of causing infection for a month, maybe more,” she added.
What you can doJaykus notes there’s no norovirus vaccine yet, although some are being developed.
“The real way to protect yourself is to wash your hands a lot. If you see somebody vomiting, go the other way. And if you’re on a cruise ship, tell somebody,” she said.
The CDC Trusted Source has put together some tips to help you keep norovirus from spreading:
1) Practice good handwashing for at least 20 seconds. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer alone won’t do.
2) Wash your fruits and vegetables. Cook seafood thoroughly.If you’re sick, don’t cook or care for others for at least 2 to 3 days after you recover.
3) Clean contaminated surfaces first, then disinfect them. Use a chlorine bleach solution with a concentration of 1,000 to 5,000 ppm (5 to 25 tablespoons of household bleach [5.25 percent] per gallon of water) or other disinfectant registered as effective against norovirus by the Environmental Protection Agency.
4) Wash your laundry thoroughly.
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Soapy was featured at the Grand Challenges Annual Meeting

Israel Innovation Authority participated in the 2019 Grand Challenges Annual Meeting co-hosted by the African Union, Ethiopia’s Ministry of Health, Grand Challenges Canada / Grands Défis Canada, USAid and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
The Grand Challenges Annual Meeting is a convening of over 1,000 key leaders from across the global community to share best practices, encourage collaboration and seek solutions for common challenges. It aims to build momentum for global health and development innovation and foster scientific collaboration among international groups and researchers.
Since 2014, Israel Innovation Authority runs a local Grand Challenges program in cooperation with MASHAV, Israel’s Agency for International
Development Cooperation.
The aim of the incentive program is to encourage R&D of innovative technological solutions to societal challenges in global health, water and food security in low income countries. The program, initially founded with the mentorship of Grand Challenges Canada, has been active since 2014 and has supported 27 technological projects to date, many of which have delivered significant impact.
At the meeting in Addis Ababa, Innovation authority presented a poster featuring the winners of the latest call for projects in health (Senecio, #Zzapp, Wheelchairs of Hope), water (Soapy, #Alumor Tipa) and food security (#OKO, Hargol FoodTech, Amaizz, Farmster).
The poster was also published in the Gates Open Research platform: link
Thank you Innovation Authority for such an honor!
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CDC – Food workers washed their hands in only 27% of activities in which they should have.

New research of the CDC reveals that food workers washed their hands in only 27% of the activities in which they should have.
Based on the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) recommendations when workers need to wash hands
  • Eating,
  • Drinking,
  • Using tobacco,
  • Coughing,
  • Sneezing,
  • Using tissue,
  • Preparing raw animal products,
  • Handling dirty equipment, and
  • Touching the body (such as scratching your nose).
CDC found that overall, workers engaged in about 9 activities an hour that should have involved handwashing with water and soap. Unfortunately, in most of the cases, they did not:
Other interesting find was that, workers were more likely to wash their hands at the right time when they were not wearing gloves than when they were.
The research was conducted by the Environmental Health Specialists Network (EHS-Net). EHS-Net is a federally funded collaboration of federal, state, and local environmental health specialists and epidemiologists.
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